History of the APGAR FAMILY in America
(Apgar Family Association, Inc.)
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   Notes   Linked to 
1  Family F02888
 
2 "Aunt Nell", as she was called, was very important to her family because she helped all her sisters, brothers, nieces, and nephews. The Scotts had no children of their own. Family F01637
 
3 "In Memoriam" by Christianna Smith '15'Mount Holyoke Alumnae Quarterly

Dr. Virginia Apgar, concerned about the health of newborn babies, gathered data from 1949-1951 to establish criteria for prognoses at the earliest possible moment. This study was believed to be the first extensive program in neonatal research ever undertaken in the US. The data was finally reduced to five signs, now known as “The Apgar Score”. The score is to be read within 60 seconds after a baby's head and feet were visible. Someone made Apgar the acronym for the test. A appearance (color), P pulse, G grimace (reflect irritability), A activity (muscle tone), R respiration. Each sign is worth 0, 1 or 2 and 10 is the best score. Virginia graduated from Mount Holyoke College, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1933, Wisconsin Medical School of Anesthesiology. Since much of her work was in the delivery room, she organized in 1949 and was head of obstetrical anesthesiology. She estimated that she had helped to deliver about 17,000 babies. 
Apgar, Dr. Virginia M.D. (I007280)
 
4 "Peg" died of cancer. Williams, Margaret (I012391)
 
5 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I023190)
 
6 13 September 1926 or 8 November 1936 Apgar, Anna Belle (I006021)
 
7 14 December 1855 or 14 December 1858 Family F00991
 
8 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F05042
 
9 16 September 1865 or 16 September 1867 Family F00859
 
10 1850 Census for Clinton Twp., NJ, lists these children, in addition to Sarah Apgar Beavers, living in the household in 1850. Family F00586
 
11 19 January 1864 or 19 August 1864 Family F00860
 
12 1907 or 1906 Family F03982
 
13 1927 or 1928 Kelly, Edwin Lawrence (I018162)
 
14 1947 or 1949 Apgar, William Ulysses (I006317)
 
15 1962 or 1963 Apgar, Walter Martin (I010686)
 
16 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F05475
 
17 2 November 1839 or 1 March 1839 Apgar, Conrad (I000033)
 
18 21 February 1807 or 26 February 1807 Family F00132
 
19 22 November 1900 or 28 November 1900 Family F01135
 
20 25 December 1923 or 24 December 1923 Family F03691
 
21 26 August 1837 or 26 October 1837 Family F00567
 
22 28 November 1830 or 1862 at 49 years McKagin, Charles (I000229)
 
23 4 April 1871 or 11 April 1871 Kagen, Eugene B. (I006239)
 
24 6 June 1945 or 27 June 1945 Family F03750
 
25 7 May 1842 or 5 July 1842 Family F00599
 
26 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F03635
 
27 A baptismal entry dated July 11, 1763, in the records of the German Reformed Church at Mount Pleasant, Hunterdon County, NJ, for "Christ’n (or Christ’r) Wagner", born June 10, 1763, lists his parents as Ad’m (or Jo’n) Wagner and Maria Soph’ Apgar (or Apger). This intriguing record, one of the earliest preserved from the Alexandria (log) Church, came to the attention of Helen S. Apgar in 1984. Helen hypothesized that Maria Sophia Apgar must have been a member of the first American-born Apgar generation, an otherwise unmentioned and previously unknown daughter of Johannes Peter Apgard. It was that she must have either died or moved with her family from Hunterdon County, perhaps to Pennsylvania. Additional information gathered since then suggests that the second guess may have been correct! Apgar, Maria Sophia (I000023)
 
28 A bell with this inscription was presented to the First Constitutional Presbyterian Church of Alexandria, Mt. Pleasant, NJ: To the glory of God, and in loving memory of ETHEL Apgar by Her Mother February 3, 1907. "A lovely being scarcely formed or molded A rose with all its sweetest leaves yet folded." "For such is the kingdom of heaven." Apgar, Ethel (I006964)
 
29 A double funeral was held for them as they died within hours of each other. They had been married 60 years. Family F02915
 
30 A newspaper article, now lost, told of George and Stanley dying the very same day, one in Maine, NY and the other in Rochester, NY. Family F02335
 
31 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I016028)
 
32 Aaron lived on the homestead farm while his family was growing up. Since all four of his sons went elsewhere to make their living, he eventually sold the farm to his cousin, John Wilson Apgar I, and went to live in a house on Cokesbury-Califon Road, later occupied by the Jones family. Apgar, Aaron A. (I001700)
 
33 Aaron lived on the homestead farm. By this time, it was referred to as the Aaron Apgar farm. There was a wooden house built close to the main highway. This gave more room for his growing family, because the homestead had the majority of his father's family still living there. Besides, by building close to the highway, it saved the task of shoveling out the long lane to the stone house as the winter snows came. However, the house did not last as long as the first house. There is scarcely a trace of the wooden house remaining. Family F00619
 
34 Aaron was seventy nine years old at the time of his second marriage. He was married in the Philhower homestead, where his nephew, Aaron A. Philhower, lived. Aaron Philhower's granddaughter, Phyllis York, was flower girl at this wedding. Family F01812
 
35 According to 1880 Census in Chester Twp, Morris County, Daniel was listed as living with his father. The 1900 Colorado Census showed that Daniel was a blacksmith, as his father, Daniel P., had been. Apgar, Daniel D. (I002490)
 
36 According to her obituary in the Hunterdon Republican, Emaline had three sons: William, George, and Howard, and two daughters: Mrs. Lewis Harrington and Mrs. Martha Fleming. The only two that can be placed are listed. Apgar, Emaline (I000653)
 
37 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F05738
 
38 According to the 1830 Census, there were two daughters under five years of age at that time. These would be older than Archibald. They may have left home by 1850 or died young. A Floretta, aged 5 mos., was in this household in 1860, a daughter of their son Archibald. Family F00284
 
39 According to the 1840 Census, there were two sons and three daughters, all surviving their sister, Maria. Their names are presently unknown. 1850 Census lists Jacob C. as 54, Maria Schureman as 52, and Mary E. as 18. No other children listed. Family F00087
 
40 According to the 1880 Census, Frederick was a constable. Frederick was bondsman for his deceased brother's (Winegarner's) minor children in 1861. Bond was for $4,000.00. Frederick and Sarah were buried in the Old Lebanon Reformed Church Cemetery in Lebanon, NJ Apgar, Frederick A. (I000676)
 
41 According to the Crownover Families USA, published 1999, Sarah married Thomas Crownover, b. 1811, d. 1886, in Huntington Twp., PA. Further research is needed to validate this information. Family F01215
 
42 According to the NJ 1850 Federal Census for Tewksbury Township, Hunterdon County, Conrad and his wife, Mary Sutten and two children were living with his parents, William Alpaugh and Charity H. Record #:344-368. Family F00604
 
43 Adam was a farmer and served in a Maryland regiment during the Revolutionary War and may have died as a result of the hardship of soldiering in 1779. Wagner, Johann Adam (I000040)
 
44 Adam went West and worked as a cowboy. He had a silver plate in his back due to a train wreck and lost a hand due to an accident with a saw. Apgar, Adam H. (I003083)
 
45 Additional children added and order of birth changed based on information from birth certificates of Frank Leslie and daughter born in 1919. Family F03329
 
46 After a career as supervisor of ground services for American Airlines in Newark and LaGuardia, John Alfred returned to his homestead, which had been farmed by the Rineharts since 1785. Rinehart, John Alfred (I009885)
 
47 After Catherine's death, Peter came back to NJ and remarried. Family F01443
 
48 After Helen and Dick married, they moved to the new Oklahoma Territory, which had just been opened for settlement. They bought a covered wagon, a team of oxen, and made the long, slow trip in 1895. They found the land they wanted a year later in Lahoma and traded $250 cash, a team of mules and a horse for the land. They began their farm with a "sod" farmhouse, built into the side of a hill with a ceiling made of unbleached muslin, so dirt could not fall into the house area. Eventually the farm grew to include a two story, three bedroom house, two large barns, lots of stock shelters, and a good sized cattle herd, work houses, a good bank account and the most prized family possession of all: a 1917 Ford Touring Automobile.

Lahoma did not have a high school in the early years, so the first three children stayed at Enid while they completed their high school studies. S. Dick was a valued member of his community and headed a group of citizens supporting the building of schools and other projects. After his death, Helen sold the farm and moved her family to Enid. All the children had been born on the farm. 
Family F02093
 
49 After her children had grown, Dorothy received her Master’s Degree in Elementary Education from Trenton State College and worked in that field for many at Warren Glen, Warren County, and Franklin Township, Hunterdon County, schools. In 1981, she retired while assistant principal of Franklin Twp. School, NJ.

She was a member of the Memorial United Methodist Church in Lake Placid and played in their Bell Choir. One of her many pleasures was her garden and especially her orchids. She was an avid reader, an opera lover and enjoyed quilting for family and friends.

Dorothy was a Trustee of the Apgar Family Association from 1986-1990 and served as Historian for close to 25 years. She was the writer of the Jacob line and book editor of “Johannes Peter Apgard and his descendants, Volume II”. She traveled through the United States and Europe in pursuit of family history. 
Young, Dorothy E. (I017349)
 
50 After her children had grown, Dorothy received her Master’s Degree in Elementary Education from Trenton State College and worked in that field for many at Warren Glen, Warren County, and Franklin Township, Hunterdon County, schools. In 1981, she retired while assistant principal of Franklin Twp. School, NJ.

She was a member of the Memorial United Methodist Church in Lake Placid and played in their Bell Choir. One of her many pleasures was her garden and especially her orchids. She was an avid reader, an opera lover and enjoyed quilting for family and friends. 
Young, Dorothy Elizabeth (I012895)
 

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